Where Are They Now

Matt Wyatt

Matt Wyatt played quarterback at Mississippi State University from 1996-1999. In 1997, he led the Bulldogs to a 7-4 record, tying for third in the SEC West. Following that year, MSU experienced a two-year stretch of success that included winning the SEC West, earning the Bulldogs a trip to the SEC Championship and the Cotton Bowl. During his career, he passed for 2,199 yards and was responsible for 14 touchdowns. Wyatt is now a sought-after sports commentator and radio personality on SuperTalk Mississippi’s Head to Head show. He has also been part of the radio broadcast team for Mississippi State Football for the past nine years. Wyatt resides in Tupelo with his wife, Annabeth, and his daughter, Mary Liddy.

Q & A

What did you enjoy most about your time as a Bulldog?

In my time playing for the Bulldogs, what I enjoyed most was the relationships and camaraderie with teammates, several of whom have become lifelong friends. Being on a team, and working alongside 100 other guys from different backgrounds, trying to achieve a goal: that was a great experience.

Can you recall a favorite memory?

My favorite memory of my playing time was helping my team win a game at Auburn in 1999. On the last play of the game, I took a knee then threw the football to my dad in the stands. He still has the ball.

Did you learn anything during that time that you have carried into your current roles?

I definitely learned what it means to work and sacrifice to try and accomplish something. Being on a team taught me what it means to be a team member, how to approach things unselfishly and put the team first. I learned how important it is to do my job, fill my role, when my team is counting on me for that. So many people go through life only focused on themselves. Everything they do, say, think, is all viewed through the lens of selfishness and self-first. Those people rarely experience the joy of accomplishing something with a team, as a team-member.


Tyson Lee

Tyson Lee joined the Mississippi State Bulldog roster in January of 2008 after a successful junior college run at Itawamba Community College. He was the first football student-athlete in the community college’s history to be named academic all-America and first team all-America in the same season. At Mississippi State, the quarterback played in 11 of 12 games, starting eight times. He completed 153 of 260 passes, earning 1,519 yards, five interceptions and seven touchdowns. Lee, a Columbus native, returned to the university as the Development Coordinator for the Bulldog Club. His primary responsibility is developing and maintaining relationships with former MSU student-athletes and assisting with development operations and membership growth. He resides in Starkville with his wife, Christa, and their two sons, Zeke and Beck.

Q & A

What did you enjoy most about your time as a Bulldog?

I enjoyed the opportunity to meet so many different people that had an impact on my life and compete at the highest level in college football. My time at Mississippi State has played such a vital role in who I am today.

Can you recall a favorite memory?

My favorite memory would be getting my first start my junior year in Tiger Stadium at LSU.

Did you learn anything during that time that you have carried into your current roles?

I learned so much during my time as a student-athlete that still impacts my life as a husband, father and employee. Sacrifice, discipline, perseverance and leadership are just a few things that I’ve carried into my current role in the Bulldog Club and in my roles as a husband and father.


Shawn Sykes

Shawn Sykes was a tailback at Ole Miss from 1985-1988. During his tenure, Rebel faithful saw Sykes tally over 1,000 rushing yards and nearly 750 receiving yards, earning him the nickname “Lightning.” Most notably, he scored two touchdowns in the first-ever Rebel victory against the University of Alabama. Sykes’ involvement in the historic upset cemented his legacy at Ole Miss. Sykes now resides in Tupelo, where he puts his broadcast degree to use producing local commercials for Bluwave.

Q & A

What did you enjoy most about your time as a Rebel?

The off-the-field experience was most memorable—the friends I made, the lessons I learned and how they parallel life. That’s probably the biggest thing, just meeting people from different places and building friendships that will last a lifetime.

Can you recall a favorite memory?

It’s one that I didn’t have to try to remember because people would always remind me of it. Prior to the recent victories against Alabama, when I was playing was the only time we had beaten Alabama in Tuscaloosa. In that game, I was blocking and I hurt my knee and came out of the game. Coach took me out, and I didn’t play any more in the first half. It was 12-0. At halftime, the coach asked me if I could go. I didn’t know, but I said yes anyway. Ran a trap play and got a 53 yard touchdown and made it 12-7. I came out of the game, coach asked if I could go back in and I said yes. Ran the trap play again and we took the lead. I had two touchdowns, and we ended up winning the game. That victory stood for a long time. We were definitely the underdog and it was their homecoming. That was the biggest game of my life.

Did you learn anything during that time that you have carried into your current roles?

Football taught me a lot of things that I use today about working hard and never giving up. I remember being a freshman and walking into the training room to take my physical. I look around and see all these guys that look like Herschel Walker, and I know I have to compete against these guys. I’m competing against seven or eight guys for one position. That’s when you have to work to be well-rounded. If you can beat them one-by-one, you end up playing. I use that mentality now with life and work.

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